Are We Trying Hard Enough to Preserve Our Mangroves in Jamaica?


Today (July 26) is World Mangrove Day. What does this mean for Jamaica? Regrettably, the average Jamaican might regard mangrove areas as dirty, smelly, somewhat scary places (scary because endangered American Crocodiles live there) – and riddled with mosquitoes. What possible benefits could they bring to the island? Personally, I find wetland areas in Jamaica … More Are We Trying Hard Enough to Preserve Our Mangroves in Jamaica?

Revitalizing the Caribbean Tourism Sector: The IDB’s Innovation Challenge


Our tourism sector has not yet emerged from the doldrums. In Jamaica, while battling COVID-19 with what appear to be depleting resources, we “opened up” to tourism on June 15. Now, close to one month later, we seem to be just feeling our way. Nevertheless, our ever-upbeat Minister of Tourism Ed Bartlett told us a few … More Revitalizing the Caribbean Tourism Sector: The IDB’s Innovation Challenge

Celebrating Caribbean Literature Day (Online)


What is Caribbean literature, who is writing – and where? This weekend, tune in to two online sessions celebrating Caribbean Literature Day. Yes, this is a “first”! And a wonderful concept. See the information below… And thanks to National Librarian Beverley Lashley for letting me know about this. By the way, I have reviewed a … More Celebrating Caribbean Literature Day (Online)

JCDT Celebrates the Fifth Anniversary of the Blue and John Crow Mountains World Heritage Site


A small ceremony took place on Friday, July 3 at Holywell, in the Blue and John Crow Mountains National Park, to celebrate the fifth anniversary of its inscription as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. I am not sure how many people realize what an achievement it was to have the site recognized for both its … More JCDT Celebrates the Fifth Anniversary of the Blue and John Crow Mountains World Heritage Site

International Fisherman’s Day, Miss May and the Blue Economy: Challenges There Are


On our weekly visits to Hellshire Beach in St. Catherine during the 1980s and early 1990s,     a stop at Miss May’s restaurant was a must. Her escoveitch fish was mouth-watering, her festivals melted in the mouth. We sat at the simple board tables in her restaurant shack, our feet in the cool sand, … More International Fisherman’s Day, Miss May and the Blue Economy: Challenges There Are

Under the Saharan Dust


We couldn’t see the mountains very well this afternoon, from Kingston. They faded into a creeping mist – the thick, concentrated dust from the West African coastline, which is expected to get thicker and deeper tomorrow (Tuesday) and Wednesday. Our Meteorological Service explained that the “plume” of dust from the Saharan Air Layer is not … More Under the Saharan Dust

Happy Summer Solstice


Tonight is the Summer Solstice. It is the longest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere and the time when the Earth is tilted most closely to the Sun (23.4 degrees, to be precise). At the same time, it is the Winter Solstice in the Southern Hemisphere, where everything is the other way round. The … More Happy Summer Solstice

Tomorrow: Jamaica’s Economic Future After COVID-19


There are a lot of interesting happenings online this week, and this is certainly one of them, to take place on Wednesday, May 20 at 11:00 a.m. Jamaica time, on Zoom (see link below). This is the third in a series of free webinars organized by Island Innovation, founded by James Ellsmoor. The first two … More Tomorrow: Jamaica’s Economic Future After COVID-19

Earth Day 2020 in the Time of COVID-19: Lessons We Are Learning


It is the eve of Earth Day 2020 (Wednesday, April 22) and its fiftieth anniversary. Last year, I collected a bunch of inspirational quotes and did some philosophizing. 2020 is a historic occasion, which we will celebrate online while something else – something almost beyond our imagination – is unfolding in our lives. Like most periods … More Earth Day 2020 in the Time of COVID-19: Lessons We Are Learning