#AToZChallengeJamaica: Q is for Queen


Queen Elizabeth II officially turned ninety years old on June 11 this year. She is the only person I know who has two birthdays. Her real one is April 21. Why? I hear it has something to do with June being a nicer month for celebrations, in terms of the weather. It might even be summer in England by then, with a bit of luck. As the Queen’s representative (and Head of State) in Jamaica, Governor General Sir Patrick Allen and his wife traveled to London to wish her a happy birthday. No, the Prime Minister is not our Head of State. We have a Queen of Jamaica.

In the Jamaican context the Queen is an obvious choice, besides the fact that there aren’t that many Q-words. She is an ever-present and at the same time ever-distant figure. She beams benevolently (one hopes) from afar on our island, once a jewel in the British colonial crown. What relevance does she have to our 21st century Small Island Developing State? It’s hard to fathom.

Publisher and editor of Spotlight magazine, Evon Blake (left), presents a specially bound copy of his magazine to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth 11 at King's House during her visit to Jamaica in 1966. Looking on are Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (right), and Ken Chaplin, chief media coordinator. (Photo: Jamaica Observer)
Publisher and editor of Spotlight magazine, Evon Blake (left), presents a specially bound copy of his magazine to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth 11 at King’s House during her visit to Jamaica in 1966. Looking on are Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (right), and Ken Chaplin, chief media coordinator. (Photo: Jamaica Observer)

The Queen has visited Jamaica six times – the last time was ten years ago, and I honestly remember nothing about it. The first time was in 1953, when she opened the Queen’s Highway on the North coast.

Do you think Jamaica should hold a referendum on whether to say goodbye to the Queen, or not? If so, how would you vote?

The ceremonial mace, carried into Parliament by the Marshal at the Opening of Parliament, is a symbol of the Queen's authority. (Photo: Gleaner)
The ceremonial mace, carried into Parliament by the Marshal at the beginning of sessions in the Upper and Lower Houses, is a symbol of the Queen’s authority. Parliament is not properly constituted without it being laid on a table.  (Photo: Gleaner)

 

The Queen believes in matching hats and coats at all times. Here she is visiting Birmingham during her Diamond Jubilee, accompanied by a man in a crazy hat (one presumes he's the Mayor). (Photo: West Midlands Police)
The Queen believes in matching hats and coats at all times. Here she is visiting Birmingham during her Diamond Jubilee, accompanied by a man in a crazy hat (one presumes he’s the Mayor). (Photo: West Midlands Police)

8 thoughts on “#AToZChallengeJamaica: Q is for Queen

  1. Reblogged this on Jamaica: Political Economy and commented:
    Emma avoids all questions of conflict by focusing on her Queen of England and our Queen of Jamaica; quite appropriate. Personally, I always like to hear the Queen give her Christmas Day message, at 3pm UK time, just as families are sitting down to their dinner.

    Like

    1. Oh my goodness, Dennis! The Christmas Day message. As a child growing up (and adult) if I was home for Christmas we used to sit down quietly in total silence while the Queen spoke on the radio…and then my father would give a toast: “To the Queen!” which we all solemnly intoned, raising our glasses of lemonade, or something stronger! Memories! A family ritual, now gone…

      Liked by 1 person

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