“A Time of Major Transition” for Jamaican Art


On several occasions, we have enjoyed the National Gallery of Jamaica’s satisfying and enjoyable free Sundays – a compilation of the performing arts, excellent coffee, the always-tempting gift shop, and of course, plenty of art. But in what direction is the once vibrant Jamaican art scene heading? Is it going anywhere at all, or merely stagnating against the background of a weak economy? The recently-appointed Chief Curator of the National Gallery Charles Campbell spoke at the opening of an exhibition of student work at the Edna Manley College for the Visual & Performing Arts in Kingston, and I thought I would share his comments here. Let’s hope that Jamaican artists of the future will take up the challenge.

National Gallery of Jamaica Blog

Nadine Hall - Sacred Bodies (2014), detail of installation - presently on view in Be Uncaged Nadine Hall – Sacred Bodies (2014), detail of installation – presently on view in Be Uncaged

The NGJ’s Chief Curator Charles Campbell was the guest speaker at the April 3 opening of Be Uncaged, an exhibition of student work at the Edna Manley College’s CAG[e] gallery. Since his remarks have broader relevance, we decided to share them here. The exhibition, which was curated by the students in the Introduction to Curatorial Studies course, is well worth visiting and remains open at the College until April 17.

One of the questions I’m frequently asked is what I think of the art scene here. It’s a complicated question to answer. Are we talking about the artists that live here, the Island’s talent pool and what’s going on behind closed doors in studios and bedrooms across the island? Is it the quality of the exhibitions we get to see, the activity…

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