Autumn Sighs: A Bit of Nostalgia from England

Autumn does not really exist in Jamaica, sadly. Yes, the temperatures ease a touch. The sun does not burn so hard. The light is a little softer. And the migrating birds arrive in our garden – bright warblers from Texas. So far, I have seen very few of our regular winter visitors, but hope to see more in the next week or so.

A year ago, I was in England, the country of my birth. At my sister’s home in Sussex, I enjoyed long walks across the fields and down paths lined with the burrows of various furry animals. Here are a few photos to give you a feel of it… Please indulge me if I share a few in the next week or two. I need to get this homesickness out of my system…

Evening time.
Evening time.
Tree embraced by ivy.
Tree embraced by honeysuckle.
A late bloomer.
A late bloomer.
Hydrangeas in the evening light.
Hydrangeas in the evening light.
The day is done.
The day is done.
A magpie. One for sorrow, two for joy, three for a girl...
A magpie. One for sorrow, two for joy, three for a girl…
A stile to climb over.
A stile to climb over.
Blackberries, best picked and put straight in the mouth, with a little warmth from the sun.
Blackberries, best picked and put straight in the mouth, with a little warmth from the sun.
The path often taken.
The path often taken.
Sweet peas.
Sweet peas.
Rose hips.
Rose hips.
The last of the roses.
The last of the roses.
Leftover hay.
Leftover hay.
I cannot remember the name of this plant...
I cannot remember the name of this plant…Ah! A reader has just informed me this is commonly called “plantain” (Plantaginaceae: plantago major and plantago lanceolata). The young leaves can be used as a pot herb and old lore says crushed leaves will stem minor bleeding and stop itching. Thanks for this, Del!
You can hear the church bells across the fields, from the village nearby.
You can hear the church bells across the fields, from the village nearby.
An old barn. That's my brother, who's the best walking companion.
An old barn. That’s my brother, who’s the best walking companion you could ever want.
Looking across the fields.
Looking across the fields.
This woodland, with dying bracken turning golden brown, is filled with bluebells in the spring.
This woodland, with dying bracken turning golden brown, is filled with bluebells in the spring.

13 thoughts on “Autumn Sighs: A Bit of Nostalgia from England

  1. The unamed plant is commonly called “plantain’ here. Plantaginaceae: plantago major & plantago lanceolata. Both are here in NS. Can. Young leaves can be used as a pot herb. Old lore also says the crushed leaves will stem minor bleeding and ease itching.
    Love the rst of the photo, too. Wish you could drive through Cape Breton right now– or northern Michigan. We’re aflame!

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    1. Oh yes – that’s right, I remember – plantain! Which is quite funny because our plantain here in the tropics is of course a large tree with banana-like fruit. Could not be more different. Thanks so much for pointing this out. Your “autumn blaze” sounds wonderful! I miss the seasons…

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      1. Thank you very much! I love the English countryside and enjoy photographing it. Hoping to go back in the spring, when we should have a baby nephew!

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