Our magical moringa trees


About a year ago, I wrote a blog about the properties of the moringa tree. After the demise of a large tree in South Camp Road, Kingston – yes, we are too fond of destroying things of value, whether our cultural or natural heritage – my husband saved some seeds and we planted them in our yard.

Well, the two slender trees are now as tall as a palm tree which has taken years to grow. I did not realize that the moringa was so fast-growing.  So here are a couple of photographs, so that you can see how well they are doing, and how easy they are to grow.

And if you are in Kingston and looking for moringa products, why not try the Prana store, a space adjoining one of my favorite art galleries, Grosvenor Galleries, with its old-fashioned garden setting.

Enjoy, health lovers! We both feel

Prana is a delightful wellness boutique in Kingston.
Prana is a delightful wellness boutique in Kingston.
The fluttering moringa leaves.
The fluttering moringa leaves.
Their delicate leaves fluttering, our two moringa trees.
Their delicate leaves fluttering, our two moringa trees.

 


20 thoughts on “Our magical moringa trees

  1. oh my goodness! i truly think that it was right here under my nose — i got the seeds b/c i liked the flowers! i went outside tonight – after studying many images – and i picked one of the few new sprouts that came back after the goat raid… it looks like moringa! the stem is a more maroon than green but th leaves look just like the others.. the aroma of the leaves hints of taking a vitamin that’s fortified with iron.. the goats ate it and did not die!!!!

    the other tree is tall and spindly, and it looks a lot like your images.. wow, i’m going to have to coddle these and get them to bloom.. well one has recently bloomed and the seeds will be 20 feet high!!!

    i think, by george, this is moringa! thanks so much for your posts! z

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      1. In India we do. In fact when my father was a boy his mother, my grandmother, cooked it so often, its pods, its leaves, in all sorts of different forms, that my dad was fed up enough to offer his four younger brothers money to cut the tree down. #Familylegend

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      2. That’s amazing. I’ve noticed in India you use many plants and trees in food in far more ways than we do in Jamaica. For example, we have tamarind too but don’t do much with it except make tamarind balls, delicious as they are…

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      3. oh that’s funny! the goats are my biggest pest, and they love the almendro leaves and obviously loved the moringa!

        just got home after a long day. tomorrow i’ll inspect the trees.. or one tree, one stunted one, and one that was severely pruned by the goats!

        z

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    1. Brilliant! We had to get a stepladder to pick our seed pods recently. And goats are very fond of moringa in Jamaica too, I understand! I am so glad that you discovered it!

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  2. I know they grow incredibly fast, for that reason they are used for quick hedges in other countries. I do believe, in addition to the stalks and seeds, the leaves can be eaten as well. I think Annie may know more than I do though. But you are so right: we are always quick to destroy, giving very little thought to the value of things.

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  3. I can verify that in terms of the age. I also planted a moringa plant in my parents yard less than a year ago and the plant that wasn’t taller than me is now several feet high, much higher than the house. It is also flowering and our bees are having a fine time of it!

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    1. Dear Veronica: Thanks for dropping by and for your comment… I haven’t seen our trees flowering…yet. I look forward to that! Ours may have had a bit of a shock – they got pushed down flat on the ground during Hurricane Sandy, but we pushed them back up and they are growing very robustly.

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  4. I just recently discovered the benefits touted about Moringa and shared same so we are definitely on the same page Emma! Must pop in to Prana’s next time I am in your town! D.

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  5. Yes Petch the Moringa or Moringikka as its called in Kerala is v fast growing. In fact its called Quickstick locally and is used when people need a quick fence of trees. we also call it the drumstick tree…ppl here don’t realize you can cook and eat the ‘drumsticks’ as we do in India…

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    1. I didn’t realize it was the same thing as Quickstick – I hadn’t made the connection! I can see though that we in Jamaica probably don’t make good enough use of it for medicinal/health purposes….Thanks so much for the information, Annie!

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